Windows to our memories



Montreal photographer Raymonde April has accumulated an impressive number of images during a career spanning over thirty years. From 2000 to 2002 she recontextualized 517 photographs drawn from her archives to make a film and installation entitled "Tout embrasser".

Memory and archives are not fixed and finite elements, but fragmented works in constant motion.

It is from this work that Anne-Marie Proulx, MA student in Art History at Concordia University, will demonstrate how an artistic production can serve as a community's memory and imagination. The originality of the student's approach lies in situating her thinking at the intersection of memory and imagination, and therefore, at the intersection of reality and fiction. For her, memory and archives are not fixed and finite elements, but fragmented works in constant motion. Their very nature disturbs the objectivity of the reconstruction of an event or story, and leaves much to the interpretation of the viewer.

Anne-Marie Proulx intends to distance herself from an approach focusing on the intimate aspect of the work of Raymonde April. Far from considering this work as isolated, she places it in its historical context and examines its social and symbolic significance in the Québec art world. Taken as a group rather than individually, the photographs of Raymonde April become witnesses to the community at a particular time, and therefore, the memory of the construction of collective identity.