The Quebec Model of Cultural Industries is Alive and Well



This is the conclusion reached by our research team, comprised of researchers from four Quebec universities, following a study that concentrated on five cultural subsectors:

books, sound-recording, film, video games and public libraries. Since 2006, we have compiled numerous statistics, met with many experts, interviewed creators, carried out a public survey and analysed media opinion in order to assess the current state of culture industries in Quebec.

Cultural production has become an end in itself rather than production for profit.

The Quebec model of cultural industries developed out of a collective and entrepreneurial desire to control a cultural space interlinked with a wider Anglophone context. But Quebec's limited market does not allow for cultural development driven uniquely by market forces. More that anywhere else in North America, cultural production has become an end in itself rather than production for profit. In order to achieve this result, quebec has developed numerous collaborative tools between private and public actors in the culture sector, thus moving away from a market- and competition-driven model. quebec has also succeeded in conquering its internal markets, obtaining a significant market share within the province – a considerable achievement.

Many feel that the model has reached its growth capacity. However, it is not obvious what direction should be taken, and there is little agreement within the milieu. Necessary actions include better integration of cultural and economic aspects, and the accordance of greater importance to economic success outside of Quebec.

The results of this research also highlight the problem of Quebec's low literacy rate and the need for better collaboration between the Ministry of Culture, Communication and the Status of Women, the Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports, and the Ministry of Municipal Affairs, Regions and Land Occupancy.

Main researcher

Claude Martin, Université de Montréal

Summary

Call for proposals

Deposit of the research report: April 2010