Approaches and Practices Promoting Student Retention and Academic Success


Summary

Competition year :

2014-2015

 

Deadline (notice or letter of intent) :

April 16th, 2014, 12 PM

 

Deadline (application) :

September 10th, 2014, 12 PM

 

Amount :

$60,000 maximum per summary

 

Duration :

18 months

 

Announcement of results :

Week of December 15th, 2014

 

Concerted Action — Targeted Program - 2nd Competition

proposed by the
Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS) and the Fonds de recherche du Québec - Société et culture (FRQSC)


1.

Objectives

The scientific community is invited to submit proposals to provide summaries of current knowledge concerning approaches and practices promoting student retention and academic success. This second competition has the same aims and falls within the same framework as the first call for proposals launched in March 2013.1 Some research requirements have been changed since three proposals were accepted in the first phase and the context has been updated.

These critical summaries will contribute to the efforts of the Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS) and the English and French school boards to improve student retention and academic success, within the results-based management framework adopted for the administration of Québec schools.

Although it shares the theme of the Research Program on Student Retention and Academic Success (RPSRAS), this call for proposals is part of a distinct targeted approach whose objectives are consistent with the implementation of the partnership agreements.


2.

Background

The improvement of governance and accountability is one of the avenues pursued by the Ministère to enhance the performance of the education system and promote student success. In 2008, this objective resulted in amendments to the Education Act.2 These amendments reflect the ongoing shift to results-based management in the Québec government. In the spirit of this shift, the Ministère has continued to develop partnerships with schools and school boards and has promoted collaboration with the various management bodies.

The partnership agreements established between the Ministère and the school boards, like the management and educational success agreements between the school boards and the schools, are tools for implementing collaboration. These agreements seek to foster consistency and complementarity between the MELS strategic plan, the strategic plan of each school board and the schools' success plans, so that all efforts are focused on actions that promote student retention and academic success.

Within the framework of the partnership agreements, the MELS orientations4 regarding student retention and academic success took the form of five specific goals. For the purpose of this call for proposals, these five goals also define the five research focuses:

  1. Increasing graduation and qualification rates among students under the age of 20
  2. Increasing proficiency in English or French, language of instruction
  3. Increasing student retention and academic success in certain target groups, particularly among students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties
  4. Creating a healthy and safe environment in educational institutions
  5. Increasing the number of students under the age of 20 in vocational training

The school boards have been asked to contribute to the achievement of these goals by "proposing measurable objectives, based on [their] situation." To this end, they have all adopted partnership agreements, which include a description of the context in which they are operating, the targeted results and the main measures each board intends to take to attain its objectives.

In this first generation of partnership agreements, the school boards could chose the means for attaining the goals they had set. They could also, if they considered it appropriate, set additional objectives. That is what the English school boards did when they included the improvement of English, language of instruction, as the sixth goal of their partnership agreement.

This second call for proposals thus reflects the context of the adoption of new forms of partnership by the Québec education system. The aim is to produce scientific knowledge supporting the practice of results-based management by the English and French school boards, in collaboration with the Ministère.


3.

Research needs

The critical summaries of research findings funded as a result of this call for proposals must:

  • provide English and French school boards with an up-to-date profile of effective, meaningful actions that promote student retention and academic success, to help them choose measures to attain this objective
  • • help English and French school boards to assimilate and use knowledge resulting from education research on student retention and academic success

In this call for proposals, effective, meaningful actions that promote student retention and academic success refers to programs, practices, approaches and tools tested and validated by research as well as those not validated by research but supported by practice in the field and by education experts.

Critical summaries of research findings that receive funding in connection with this call for proposals must provide a systematic review of written research (which can go as far as a meta-analysis of research results). In addition, when institutional data (relevant to the need the critical summary is intended to meet) are available, the summary may also incude a survey of practices accompanied by comparative analyses.

In this competition, the critical summary of research findings is understood to refer to an inventory and critical analysis of scientific knowledge and data derived from educational institutions (if applicable) for any of the research needs identified as priorities in this call for proposals. The summary should take stock of the available knowledge, but also offer a critical analysis of recent research that suggests avenues for reflection for researchers, decision makers and education community stakeholders.


SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS REGARDING THE TRANSFER OF KNOWLEDGE
To facilitate the use and transfer by French and English school boards of scientific knowledge resulting from the critical summaries of research findings, all proposals submitted must include a knowledge dissemination and transfer strategy. Researchers who wish to obtain help in defining and implementing their transfer strategy are encouraged to join forces with other researchers specialized in the field, research infrastructures (teams, strategic groups, chairs, etc.) or organizations with expertise in this area.5 They are also encouraged to consult the Revue systématique des écrits sur le transfert de connaissances en éducation, which identifies best practices in knowledge transfer in education.6 In submitting their letter of intent, researchers must specify their approach and explain how they propose to ensure the transfer of the knowledge resulting from their critical summary. Similarly, to promote the optimal use of this knowledge and its dissemination in the anglophone and francophone communities, researchers are strongly encouraged to make the transferred or disseminated materials that they produce available in English and French (e.g. abstracts in accessible language, guides, tools).7

OTHER ASPECTS TO CONSIDER WITH A VIEW TO ENHANCING THE RELEVANCE OF THE PROPOSALS

Researchers are encouraged to:

  • make an inventory of effective and meaningful actions in the English and French school systems. Researchers who limit their focus to only one of the school systems must explain their reasons for doing so.
  • take into account gender and language of instruction (English or French), when the data used allow for it.
  • consider the "disadvantaged areas" aspect when there are data available from the research or educational institutions surveyed for the critical summary of research findings. In the context of Québec educational administration, consideration of this aspect must take into account the deprivation index.8
  • make an inventory of actions that are effective and meaningful for student retention and academic success in Québec, other Canadian provinces and territories, and other countries, as long as the social and cultural contexts of the actions are clearly indicated.

4.

Research priorities

The priority research focuses are based on the goals set within the framework of partnership agreements.

Researchers must propose projects that address one or another of the needs presented under each focus and clearly indicate, in their letter of intent and funding request, the need (e.g. 2.3) their critical summary of research findings will meet.
As in the first competition, one grant will be awarded per need, according to scientific excellence (ranking based on scientific evaluation criteria).

FOCUS 1: Increasing graduation and qualification rates among students under the age of 20

The current development of a first Politique nationale de lutte contre le décrochage scolaire (provincial policy to encourage students to stay in school)9 demonstrates the importance of this issue for Québec society. Dropping out of school is a complex phenomenon resulting from a host of factors.10 Combatting it will thus require timely intervention at different levels with regard to several of these factors (students, teachers, classrooms, schools, families, the community). Along the same lines, the measures implemented to ensure that two thirds of students obtain their diploma within the required time, and to increase the number of students earning a first diploma or other qualification before the age of 20, must be, from this perspective, just as diversified.Many different factors affect the graduation and qualification rates,11 including the teacher-student relationship, teaching practices, school climate, the organization of educational services and the support provided by the community and the family. Taking account of the differences and similarities between the English12 and French school systems could doubtless be very useful for the purpose of updating approaches and practices that promote student retention and academic success.

THIS FOCUS INVOLVES THE FOLLOWING RESEARCH NEEDS:

Need 1.1 Family-school-community collaboration practices

What conditions and effective practices are most likely to foster collaboration between the family, the school and the community at the elementary, secondary, adult education and vocational training levels for all clients and particularly for Aboriginal students, immigrant students, and students from disadvantaged areas?

Need 1.2 Helping students between the ages of 15 and 19 who are enrolled in vocational training or adult general education to stay in school

What practices and approaches can encourage students aged 15 to 19 to stay in adult general education or vocational training? These practices and approaches may concern school organization or the services available to students, such as complementary educational services, ways of learning, the school or family environment (including, for example, family or parental involvement).

Need 1.3 The teacher-student relationship and student support practices

Which approaches and practices focused on the teacher-student relationship influence the student's involvement in school in elementary and secondary school, in adult general education and in vocational training on the cognitive, affective and motivational levels? Which socioeducational services provide better support for students and help them to persevere and succeed in school (e.g. support and guidance, coaching, tutoring, mentorship, etc.)?

FOCUS 2: Increasing proficiency in English or French, language of instruction

It is important to improve the quality of the students' English or French, as proficiency in the language of instruction is one of the key determinants of academic success. More specifically, "comprehension of written material is the foundation of learning in all subjects."13 The actions taken by the Ministère14 are appropriate given the important contribution of learning and mastering the language of instruction to retention and academic success. The numerous data produced by research in this field15 support the need to identify at-risk students as soon as they enter school, to rapidly implement appropriate measures and to provide suitable follow-up. Research also underscores the key role of teaching, both in developing students' competency in reading and in motivating them to read. The research also presents the practices considered effective for developing competency in reading. Learning and mastering a language of instruction may pose many difficult challenges, especially for students who have accumulated problems in this area since the beginning of their schooling and who enroll in adult general education or vocational training in order to earn their first diploma. Proficiency in the language of instruction also represents a major challenge in the educational experience of Aboriginal and immigrant students, as it does for anglophone and allophone students. To sum up, all those already experiencing such difficulties confront major challenges to obtain their first diploma or occupational qualification. So do the teachers who work with these students.

THIS FOCUS INVOLVES THE FOLLOWING RESEARCH NEEDS:

Need 2.1 Training and support for teachers and non-teaching professionals
Which professional development models are most effective in the teaching of French (as the language of instruction or as a second language), English (as the language of instruction), reading, writing and oral communication at the preschool, elementary and secondary levels? What impact does the participation of teachers and non-teaching professionals in training and support programs have on the diversification of their respective language teaching practices?

Need 2.2 Learning French as a second language

In the context of French immersion at the elementary level, which methods of teaching French as a second language are most effective? Which pedagogical approaches and practices allow for the creation of links between learning reading and writing in French as a second language, and in English as a mother tongue?

Need 2.3 Difficulties in English or French (as languages of instruction) experienced by students aged 15 to 19 who are enrolled in adult general education or vocational training

What approaches and practices can effectively reduce reading and writing problems in the language of instruction (English or French) of students aged 15 to 19 who are enrolled in adult general education or vocational training, particularly immigrant students and Aboriginal students? What do research studies say specifically about the effects of these practices on students?

FOCUS 3: Increasing student retention and academic success in certain target groups, particularly among students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties

In recent years, the Ministere and its partners16 have prioritized the improvement of student retention and academic success among certain target groups, such as at-risk students,17 and students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties. Many studies have shown that such students often have difficulties in school, which lead to academic delays, high drop-out rates and low graduation rates, whatever their educational path. Effective action is contingent on early screening and intervention and on the creation of continuity in the provision of services, particularly for students going into adult general education (AGE) and vocational training (VT). Consequently, students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties who are grappling with academic delays when they embark on vocational training or adult general education require special support. In short, particular attention must be paid to at-risk students and students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties in order to determine which corrective or preventive measures would be best suited to them.

Moreover, issues associated with student integration and academic success are more specific and complex among certain target groups, including students from disadvantaged areas, immigrant students and Aboriginal students. Cultural differences and a poor command of the language of instruction are among the obstacles most often encountered by immigrant students18 and Aboriginal students.19 It is important to draw up a list of promising teaching practices that are already being used in disadvantaged areas and that foster the integration and academic success of immigrant and Aboriginal students.

THIS FOCUS INVOLVES THE FOLLOWING RESEARCH NEEDS:

Need 3.1 Service organization models for students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties

What are the different service organization models and effective practices currently being used in the English and French school systems to organize services and effective practices for elementary and secondary school students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties? What effects do these models and practices have on the student retention and academic success of students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties? These services and practices can include school organization, student grouping, the organization of complementary educational services, support and supervision, early screening for problems, differentiated instruction, collaboration between the school and the family, and the resources allocated.

Need 3.2 Issues associated with the integration of immigrant and Aboriginal students in the schools

Which interventions foster the integraton and academic engagement of Aboriginal and immigrant students (e.g. psychoeducational approaches, activities in connection with the construction of identity, pedagogical support, support and guidance for parents, innovative projects)? What are the effects of these interventions?

Need 3.3 Effectice practices in disadvantaged areas

Which conditions and effective practices used in elementary and secondary schools in disadvantaged areas produce the best results in terms of academic success and graduation levels (e.g. communities of practice, entrepreneurial projects, support for teachers and vulnerable students, teacher/student relationships, teaching strategies, collaboration between schools and families)?

Need 3.4 The services provided to students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties in vocational training and adult general education

Which different service organization models and effective practices are used in the English and French education systems for students with handicaps, social maladjustments or learning difficulties who are enrolled in vocational training or adult general education? How do these models and practices impact student retention and academic success?

FOCUS 4: Creating a healthy and safe environment in educational institutions

It is important to ensure that students have a safe and healthy school environment. Indeed, research data indicate that the environment has an important influence on students' perception of their school experience and could, in some cases, have direct or indirect consequences on their retention and academic success. What the research shows is that the more students are accepted in their class and feel that they are integrated into a social network, the greater is their engagement in school.20 Moreover, participation in secondary school extracurricular activities does not appear to be a good indicator of higher graduation rates21 (even though the students often enjoy these activities) and apparently has a very limited impact on the academic and social integration of students from disadvantaged areas.22

Drawing on the policy framework Going the Healthy Route at School, many initiatives have been used in elementary and secondary school.23 In the same vein, the green book, the first step toward the future Politique nationale du sport, du loisir et de l'activité physique 24 is in line with the government's objective to improve the quality of individual and collective life.

For some years now, MELS and the school boards have taken many measures to prevent and combat violence at school.25 This issue constitutes the focus of a research chair on safety and violence in educational institutions,26 funded by MELS. One of its missions is to strengthen the connections between research and practice in order to orient educational (school) and social (community) measures as well as actions regarding safety and violence. As a result, the research themes addressed in the present context will concern the creation of a healthier environment in the schools.

THIS FOCUS INVOLVES THE FOLLOWING RESEARCH NEED:

Need 4.1 The creation of a healthier environment in the schools

What are the essential conditions and most effective strategies for creating a healthier environment in our elementary and secondary schools? These conditions and strategies may be organizational or pedagogical (e.g. daycare services, food services, extracurricular activities, cooperation involving school staff, training for teachers and non-teaching professionals, alignment with the programs of study, measures for fostering healthy life habits, stress management, the prevention of mental illness among students and school staff).

FOCUS 5: Increasing the number of students under the age of 20 in vocational training

In the context of growing demand for skilled labour, it is extremely important27 to increase the number of students under the age of 20 in vocational training. Their underrepresentation in vocational training has been a major concern for some years. MELS, the school system, and university researchers have all focused on this problem, whether by documenting its causes or by proposing concrete solutions. New paths are offered to increase the appeal, diversity, fluidity and accessibility of vocational training (e.g. the Applied General Education Path, school projects preparing students to enter vocational training, concurrent-program option which allows students to take general education and vocational training concurrently, the provisional bridge between training for a semiskilled trade and certain vocational training programs).
Too few young people choose vocational training, notably because they have a negative perception of its value, are unfamiliar with the trades to which it leads and unaware of the possibilities it affords with regard to continuing their education. It must be understood that the decision to enroll in it is the concrete result of an often complex process of educational and career guidance, in which parents, peers, teachers and non-teaching professionals exercise a major influence on students under the age of 20, especially those in the 16-to-18 age group.28 More specifically, the students' knowledge of themselves, their personal interests, aptitudes, values and personal requirements with regard to a career also plays a role in the process. Earning a Diploma of Secondary Studies (SSD)—whether in general education in the youth sector (GEY) or in adult general education (AGE)—and sometimes spending some time in CEGEP are now among the paths leading to vocational training. Without denying the fact that some students interrupt their studies, drop out and change programs, it must be admitted that graduation rates in vocational training are extremely high, especially among students who are enrolled full-time.29

THIS FOCUS INVOLVES THE FOLLOWING RESEARCH NEEDS:

Need 5.1 The influence of parents and peers

Given that parents and peers have a major influence on the academic and career choices of young people under the age of 20, it is important to establish the practices that are most likely to make parents and peers more aware of their influence. What effective practices can they adopt?

Need 5.2 Actions related to academic and career guidance

As regards academic and career guidance, which of the approaches currently used in elementary and secondary schools or by other partners outside the schools are most likely to have a positive influence on the academic and career choices of young people under the age of 20, particularly on the decision as to whether or not to enroll in vocational training? For example, in Secondary Cycle Two, what impact do professional development programs have on the students' academic and career choices? How do these practices and programs affect the development of vocational training students' occupational maturity and continuity in training?

Need 5.3 The issues of training leading to qualifications

What means have been established to identify the factors that motivate students and encourage them to start or continue studies in vocational training? What have we learned from research study findings on the effectiveness of these means in enabling young people to not only enroll in vocational training but to continue in it? These means may concern student guidance, their sensitization to the realities of the labour market, innovative programs, partnerships with employers, collaboration between the schools and the community, the matching of training and employment opportunities, etc.


5.

Conditions Governing the Competition and Grant Eligibility Criteria

A description of the Concerted Action program and the rules governing it is available at the following address: http://www.frqsc.gouv.qc.ca/upload/editeur/AC-2014-2015_EN.pdf

  • This program provides funding for grants of a maximum value of $60,000 each. Only one grant can be allocated to each research need.
  • The funding period begins on January 1, 2015, and ends on June 30, 2016 (18 months).
  • The final research report must be submitted no later than three months after the end of the term of the grant, on September 30, 2016.
  • The grant must be used to finance current expenses directly related to the carrying out of a research project.
  • In accordance with the Common Rules and Regulations of Québec's three funding agencies, each researcher may submit only one application as a project leader.
  • The Concerted Action Program competition is intended for researchers based in universities and colleges, as well as institutional researchers who may act as project leaders.
  • This program meets the criteria established by the FRQSC in its Concerted Action program regarding the eligibility of researchers, eligible expenses,30 intellectual property,31 sums allocated and grant periods. The eligibility rules for researchers and the definitions of the different statuses are presented in the Concerted Action program.
  • All the necessary information on preparing and submitting letters of intent and funding applications is presented in the Concerted Action program. This document contains only information on the criteria used to determine a project's relevance and on the scientific evaluation process.
  • Applications may be submitted in English or in French. However, the project title and summary must be in French.
  • Since this call for proposals is part of the Concerted Action program, researchers who receive financial assistance are expected to participate in monitoring activities held under this program. Funded researchers, program partners and FRQSC members will participate in these activities, which are held in French. They are organized by the FRQSC so that research progress can be monitored and findings shared with program partners. Refusal to participate in these activities may lead to a suspension of grant payments. The travel costs inherent in these activities must be provided for in the budget of the grant.
  • The researchers funded under this competition must ensure that their research findings are presented in clear language to maximize their potential impact on groups most likely to benefit from the research. The FRQSC has developed a guide,32 to which researchers can refer when writing their final research report. Since appendixes can be added, all additional information can also be included in the report.
  • As with all research projects, holders of grants or fellowships from this competition must indicate in all reports, articles or other communications that their research was subsidized under the Concerted Action program by the Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport in conjunction with the FRQSC. To ensure that this condition is met, a reminder to this effect will be issued by the FRQSC to grant and fellowship holders; this information must be included in progress reports as well as the final research report.
  • College researchers who participate in an application as regular team members may receive the statutory grant of $7 000 and may apply for leave from teaching in accordance with the Programme pour le dégagement de la tâche d'enseignement des chercheurs de collège.33 This funding will, however, only be available if the Politique nationale de recherche et d'innovation (PNRI) allows it.

6.

Letter of intent : Content and Evaluation criteria

Those interested in one of the funding opportunities offered through this competition must complete the electronic letter of intent form on the FRQSC Web site, at www.frqsc.gouv.qc.ca. Click on "Mon dossier électronique et curriculum vitae." At this stage, only the curriculum vitae of the project leader is required. The CV should also be completed on the form provided for this purpose (Canadian Common CV)), which is also available on the FRQSC Web site.

Applicants will be disqualified if they do not obtain a minimum mark of 70% for their letter of intent. For more information on preparing the letter of intent and on the evaluation of relevance, please refer to the rules of the Concerted Action program. The evaluation criteria for the letters of intent are as follows:

 
Critical summary of research findings
Criteria Indicators Weighting
Relevance of the project to the objectives and needs set out in the call for proposals
  • Relevance of the project to the objectives of the call for proposals
  • Project's ability to meet the needs set out in the call for proposals
  • Effort to address the needs targeted and the main focus presented in the call for proposals
60 points
Criterion with a pass mark of 70%
Anticipated impact
  • Applicability of the expected results
  • Potential impact of the results on the orientation and application of public policies and programs
20 points
Transfer of knowledge
  • Scope and quality of knowledge transfer strategy to projected users
20 points

 

The recommendations of the relevance committee responsible for evaluating the letters of intent will be transmitted to the scientific evaluation committee. Researchers must take into account the comments and suggestions made in this step or justify, in their application, their decision not to do so.


7.

Application for funding : Content and Evaluation criteria

Researchers who are asked to submit a full application for funding must complete the electronic form found under "Mon dossier électronique et curriculum vitae" on the FRQSC Web site, at www.frqsc.gouv.qc.ca. Applicants will be disqualified if they do not obtain a minimum mark of 70% for their application. The evaluation criteria for the applications are as follows:

Critical summary of research findings
Criteria Indicators Weighting
Scientific quality of the project
  • Relevance of the perspective from which the question is addressed and quality of the literature review (20 pts)
  • Capacity of the approach to identify the strengths and weaknesses of scientific studies on the topic under study and new avenues for research or intervention, and contribution to the advancement of knowledge (25 pts)

45 points


Criterion with a pass mark of 70%

Scientific ability of the team
  • Specific expertise in the proposed field of research (10 pts)
  • Scientific productivity of team members commensurate with their experience (10 pts)
20 points
Anticipated impact
  • Consideration of the comments of the relevance committee (5 pts)
  • Quality of the knowledge dissemination and transfer strategy for familiarizing potential users with the research results, including the joint research partners (10 pts)
  • Anticipated impact on the orientation and application of programs and policies in the field targeted by the call for proposals (10 pts)
25 points
Contribution to the training of researchers
  • Quality of the monitoring and activities planned to enhance the students' training (5 pts)
  • Inclusion of students in the project (as well as postdoctoral research trainees, if applicable) and the nature of the tasks assigned to them (5 pts)
10 points
 

 


8.

Scientific evaluation procedure and announcement of results

The FRQSC will support quality research, use public funds responsibly and act impartially in awarding grants and fellowships in this competition, rigorously evaluating34 the applications submitted. It will carefully recruit evaluators and closely supervise the work of the evaluation committees. Fellowship and grant applications are evaluated by multidisciplinary peer committees. Committee members may come from Québec, other Canadian provinces or abroad; their expertise must be related to the applications submitted; they must also have experience in the areas of subsidized research and evaluation. If necessary, the committee may seek the opinion of outside experts. The evaluation committees carry out their responsibility rigorously, taking into account the research traditions in the various disciplines concerned and examining the budget of each recommended application for feasibility and accuracy. When the committee meets, at least one representative of the partners is present to observe the deliberations. At the end of the evaluation process, the committee will submit the list of applications it recommends for funding, in order of merit, to the FRQSC's board of directors and its partners.


9.

Competition dates and beginning of the grant period

The letter of intent, completed online on the FRQSC Web site, must be submitted no later than 4:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014. Any required supporting documents must be submitted by midnight on the same date. The date of the e-mail, the Canada Post postmark or a messenger's dated receipt constitute sufficient proof that the required documents were sent within the time limit. An official response to the letters of intent will be issued by e-mail in the week of May 19, 2014.

Applications for funding, completed online on the FRQSC Web site, must be submitted no later than 4:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014. Any required supporting documents must be submitted by midnight on the same date. The date of the e-mail, the Canada Post postmark or a messenger's dated receipt constitute sufficient proof that the required documents were sent within the time limit. An official announcement concerning the results of the competition will be made in the week of December 15, 2014.

The grant period begins on JANUARY 1, 2015.


10.

Mailing and contact info

The e-mail address for the submission of supporting documents for the application is:
actions-concertees.sc@frq.gouv.qc.ca
(specify the name of the competition in the subject line, and the number of the application and the name of the project leader in the e-mail).

Supporting documents that cannot be transmitted electronically should be sent to the following address:
Fonds de recherche du Québec - Société et culture
Programme Actions concertées
Concours : Approches et pratiques – 2e concours
140, Grande-Allée Est, bureau 470,
Québec (Québec) G1R 5M8

For more information, please contact: For questions or problems of a technical nature, please contact:
Marc Bélanger
Concerted Action program coordinator
Fonds de Recherche du Québec – Société et culture
Telephone: 418-643-7582, extension 3192
E-mail: actions-concertees.sc@frq.gouv.qc.ca

Odile Renaud
Administrative technician
Fonds de Recherche du Québec – Société et culture
Telephone: 418-643-7582, extension 3194
E-mail: odile.renaud@frq.gouv.qc.ca

 


12.

Appendix 2 - Information for researchers and partners on the Conditions governing intellectual property

Recognition of intellectual property rights
In accordance with the "Action Plan for Managing Intellectual Property in Universities and Institutions of the Health and Social Service Network Where Research Activities Are Conducted," as well as with current research community practices, the FRQSC and the partners recognize that the original raw data, the interim research and the findings of research funded under this program are the intellectual property of the researchers.
 

Rights of the parties with regard to the original raw data and interim research
The FRQSC and the financial partners may—for the purposes of reproduction, translation, public communication (by any means whatsoever), public demonstration, further research studies, etc.—use the original raw data collected by the researchers or under their supervision, provided they first obtain the researchers' permission. As well, the parties may use the interim research (communicated through monitoring activities or in interim reports), provided they first obtain the researchers' permission.
Rights of the parties with regard to the final report and the research findings
The FRQSC and the financial partners may—for the purposes of reproduction, translation, public communication (by any means whatsoever), public demonstration, further research studies, etc.—use the final report. As well, they may use any research findings that have been publicly disseminated by the researchers (in the context of a scientific publication, a presentation, a conference, a convention or publication on a Web site). The project leader agrees to disclose all the research results as soon as possible, through follow-up activities, the final report, transfer activities, publications, and other means.
 

Quotations
The FRQSC and the financial partners agree to always observe the rules for quotations that are customary in the academic community, notably in the case of further studies conducted on the basis of the research findings.
 

Acceptance of the grant
By accepting the grant, the project leader cedes a non-exclusive, non-transferable copyright licence on the Final Report, without territorial limits (worldwide) and for an unlimited period of time, for which the grant constitutes consideration. This licence is granted to the Fonds Société et Culture as well as to each of its financial partners. The project leader assures the FRQSC and each of its financial partners that he/she holds all the rights that entitle him/her to consent to the assignment of copyright in accordance with this agreement.


13.

Appendix 3 : Scores and rating grid for evaluation committees

Scores and ratings grid for evaluation committees
  Score Rating
Exceptional
Demonstrates outstanding scientific rigour
90 to 100 % A +
Remarkable
Exceeds standards in terms of scientific rigour
85 to 89,9 % A
Excellent
Meets standards in terms of scientific rigour
80 to 84,9 % A -
Very good
Minor weaknesses
75 to 79,9 % B +
Good
Weaknesses (a series of minor weaknesses or a more significant weakness).
70 to 74,9 % B
Significant weaknesses 60 to 69,9 % C
Clearly insufficient 59,9 % and below D
Score attributed to an application that did not earn the passing score of 70% (B) required on one or several eliminatory criteria, as indicated in the program. Z
An evaluation committee will only recommend applications with a minimum total score of 70% (B) and a minimum score of 70% on each eliminatory criterion.

 


Do you have questions?

agent picture

Marc Bélanger

Responsable de programmes

 actions-concertees.sc

418 643-7582, poste 3192

Assistance informatique

Courriel : centre.assistance.sc
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